West Coast High

Has it really been a decade since we opened in Oregon? No. Actually, it’s been 9 years. Summer, 2008 I landed out here after a few years of research and prep just in time for the roughest economic face plant many of us have known (and I’ve known 4 others in our 30 years).

I liken that whole beginning to parachuting out of an airplane amidst blue skies into a thick but fluffy-enough bunch of clouds. Once inside, there was some suggestive bumping about, some troublesome turbulence, but not a clear sign yet of what lay ahead. Then suddenly I break through those clouds and the scene below me opens like a battlefield movie: burning buildings, scorched earth, hungry villagers with widening eyes and the air full of acrid smoke. (Yes, yes I’m exaggerating for effect. There were no burning buildings.)

That was the starting of our west coast effort at the beginning of that darned big recession. In looking back, it might have been better to hang out on the beach for 4 or 5 years rather than make the effort we did to build our business in such a setting. But I am neither prescient nor idle, and so work we did.

…and we’ve made great progress, and well, we’re pretty glad we didn’t just hang out on the beach. I would have gone insane.

Sean seems to be our resident selfie expert. Here he captured himself along with a few of the rest of us west coasters: Darren, Richard La Trobe (artist and bridge maker), me, David, and Quinn.

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Unstoppable Views, Freezing Temps, and Heavy Timber. Welcome to Michigan!

top of frame MI raising mike wResidents of Indiana, Doug and Tammy have called Grand Traverse Bay, Michigan their second home for 18 years. The site they’ve enjoyed over those years includes lake frontage and views worth talking about. (Mike W captured the panoramic above from the peak of the frame on crisp day.) The couple frequented several timber home shows where they met New Energy Works Drake Ambrosino, and we’ve helped them bring it to reality this Winter.

roof trusses drake 2We were told the weather is usually great in Grand Traverse, but that lake-effect snow is no joke near the water. While Darren, Mike, Anthony, and Noah were raising the frame, some tough weather hit the site. For nearly two weeks the temperatures ranged from just above zero into the teens with daily snow. The flakes didn’t diminish the team’s energy as they joined the custom stained Douglas fir main frame, front porch, and rear balconies.

snow flying grand t michigan framedarren directs crane bad weather drake jobMI snow Drake truck DrakeT&G of the same species and finish was installed over the main frame, followed by SIP roof panels. Mike W told us, with a quick chuckle from behind his hearty beard, that high winds were ‘a challenge’ for the SIP panel installation in particular.

custom stained t and g for mIPorter Builders from Kewadin, MI will be completing the home throughout 2017. Points of interest within just an hour of this project include Charlexoix, Petoskey, Traverse City, Torch Lake, and many ski areas.

MI raising mike w

Sweeping Views and Gusting Wind: Raising the Barn in Colorado

newemailblast_12-2-16-aJim & Rebecca came to us with a dream for a timber frame barn that would be a centerpiece to their hilltop property in Castle Rock, CO. What a spot to call home! Our timber frame team arrived from Oregon to spend three weeks on-site raising the frame and enclosing the barn – all while soaking in the scenery.

20161004_18001620161005_174805Over the next few weeks, the team learned that Jim had fallen in love with timber frames in Ohio and made it a goal to call one his own. That’s our kinda’ goal; our thanks to Jim & Rebecca for enlisting us to build this 80′ by 32′ rough sawn Douglas fir timber frame barn.

20161006_1814061The barn doesn’t use any true trusses, but has plenty of traditional mortise and tenon joinery crafted in our McMinnville, OR shop by Darren, Mike, Jimmy, Todd, and David. A clerestory brings light into the structure while a ‘tower’ adds dynamic space.

20161010_07221720161013_094800Dynamic = dramatic, right? With regular wind gusting upwards of 120 mph on the hilltop, the team tells us (with their usual aplomb) there were a few interesting days. We can only imagine that flying structural insulated panels (SIPs) to enclose the frame while the wind whipped was quite a challenge. Extra straps, extra patience, and extra vigilance were certainly required. The SIP walls are 6.5″ achieving an R value near R28 while the 10 1/4″ roof SIPs achieve R42. Overall the enclosure is rated to handle those +120 mph winds.

 

fb_img_1476499532850On a free weekend, Mike, Darren, Todd, and Jimmy visited past clients in Estes Park, CO.

20161009_170125We know it can be hard to turn these congenial guys away, and John & Cindy went beyond to welcome them. They were even treated to a tour of the home and the entertainment of local wildlife.

An unexpected drop-in was met with smiles and a tour of John and Cindy's timber frame home. (Gosh we have wonderful clients! Or 'lovely folks' as Mike described.)

An unexpected drop-in was met with smiles, snacks, and a tour of John and Cindy’s timber frame home. (Gosh we have wonderful clients! Or, as Mike described them, “lovely folks”.)

Back at Jim & Rebecca’s the team finished the enclosure, complete with gable walls that extend higher than the roof, and give the barn a distinct look. The barn will function as part garage, part housing, with a full in-law suite on the upper level.

20161015_155103We’re looking forward to visiting Jim & Rebecca in 2017 and we’ll be sure to grab some images of the completed barn. We’d also like to note that the design for the barn was done by Kathy Eichelberger Jones, AIA of ArchStyle, Inc.

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Mike models a Superman t-shirt, a fun gift from a vendor, while installing t&g on the barn roof.

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The crew arrives on site during a foggy morning.

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The pre-assembled bents sitting on the barn foundation give a sense of just how large the structure will be once raised.