A Lakeside Home: Transformation with Integrity

lake home remodel w timberThe challenge was set: take a well-loved 1980’s family home and transform both aesthetics and functionality. Our design and build teams embraced the challenge with gusto. Ty Allen, head of our Design/Build groups and our in-house Architect, gave us the cliff notes.

During our first site visit we captured this image of the home's roadside facade.

During the first site visit Ty and team captured this image of the home’s roadside facade.

The homeowners built their family lake home over 25 years ago. They raised their children and made countless memories. Yet, the 1980’s contemporary design was no longer meeting all of their needs and had become dated in style. We were building a new timber frame home on a neighboring lake and we’re told that project was part of the inspiration for couple to join our community and incorporate timber framing into their lives.

Ty explained, “I think 80’s contemporary homes are the best type of existing home to transform. They are often a clean slate with open volumes and simple details.” Remodeling requires balance – the changes for this home would be bold. “We wanted to respect the integrity of the existing home, using what was already existing as a springboard to modernizing how the home looks, feels, and works.”

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The original roadside facade (above) and with updates (below).

orig car port and front of house“A good example is the porte co·chère,” continued Ty. From the road it was difficult to tell what the structure was particularly as the roof flowed down from the house as one mass over the car port. The existing porte co·chère was removed and re-imagined, presenting a gable end on the roadside facade. “Rotating the roof lines defined the porte co·chère and allowed it to have impact. It is the primary focus the facade while maintaining the original purpose of the space.”

 

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Tear off of the original car port.

The naked timber frame of the new porte co·chère.

The naked timber frame of the new porte co·chère.

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Rotating the roof lines to present a gable end on the roadside facade redefined the car port as a focal point while maintaining function.

Under the new carport a custom door from NEWwoodworks welcomes guests.

Under the new carport a custom door from NEWwoodworks welcomes guests.

drawing out the garage additionA major new functional improvement: a three car garage. The home’s original single car garage was ideally situated for transformation into the transitional space (mud room) from the new garage into the home. Our team had several visits to the build-site to stake out the garage addition. While accommodating set-backs and other regulations, they worked to get the angle, the flow, of foundation for the new garagethe new structure to fit best with the existing garage, house, and driveway and be considerate of lake views. “We wanted to create a courtyard effect with easy access to the home so the setting of the garage was key. The mud room offers the first garage with roof going onglimpses of the lake as you transition through it from the garage or as visitors move down the drive in front of it.”completed garage with timber by new energy worksThe lakeside facade had a large span of roof and large windows which allowed harsh western sun into the home. “We were deliberate about the fenestration [window placement]. The placement and scale of glass needed to lower solar heat gain was carefully balanced with taking in lake views.” The new fenestration, updated Marvin windows, breaks in the roof lines, and an expansive covered porch improved efficiency and style. Covered space on the lakeside not only provides more enjoyable year-round shelter from the elements for the homeowners, their family and friends, but for the home as well.

The lake side of the home before (top) and with the remodel nearly complete (bottom).

The lake side of the home before (top) and with the remodel nearly complete (bottom).

Inside the home timber elements were added to the great room and entry. Beginning at the porte co·chère entry, the same truss style flows through the central great room and back outside to the lakeside porch. What’s next? An interior timber ‘bridge’ is on the list. It will replace the current loft-bridge to connect the bedrooms on the upper level.

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Interested in seeing more of our projects? See our website galleries. Want more images of this lake home remodel? See the below photo collection:

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Updating the lakeside facade and a glimpse of the back of the new garage.

Updating the lakeside facade and a glimpse of the back of the new garage.

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The home's boat launch also features timber framing.

The home’s boat launch also features timber framing.

Stone for the new chimney.

Stone for the new chimney.

New walls.

New walls.

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A Family Retreat on Canandaigua Lake: Working the Land

“I’ll give you the whole story if you share those with me.” I glanced at the white box with orange fish dancing across the outside. Crackers for information, the deal of the day. With a smile I handed the box over to Pete, one of our design group architects and the design leader on our current Canandaigua Lake general contracting project.lake-retreat-rendering2“So Megan,” Pete began in his usual serious-but-joking-and-easygoing manner, “You want to know about the Canandaigua Family Retreat? Well, Dan & Laurie have been looking for the right site for about three years now. They gave us a call and asked if we’d come check out the spot they’d found. They felt really good about it, but wanted our take, which I thought was pretty cool. I like being involved from the beginning, especially because I had a good idea of what they wanted their project encompass.”

getfile-7“Had their three year search reached an end?” I asked as the crackers disappeared with unnatural speed.

“It had,” he confirmed. “We knew our design plans would be influenced by stringent site constraints associated with being near the water (height restrictions, erosion/sediment concerns, set-backs, etc) and the nature of the narrow, deeply sloping land. But it was perfect for Dan & Laurie’s home.”

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I attended the raising (more on this in another post) and I agree with Pete; it is a great spot. It is nestled into the hillside and it maintains privacy even though it is on the lake. The land slopes away allowing views of the water through pockets of mature trees. I couldn’t help thinking it was as if the land had secret views of the lake, but hey, I’m a romantic at heart.

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The steep site offers elevated views of Canandaigua Lake.

“Why Canandiagua Lake? Why timber framing?”

Pete grabbed another handful of crackers before answering, “Laurie grew up visiting a family lake home – who doesn’t love those? Canandiagua is a good ‘meeting’ spot for Dan, Laurie, their kids, parents, and extended family. A central location everyone likes.

A few years back they checked out a lake home that happened to be a timber frame we’d built in the 2000’s. They loved it and were inspired to build their own on Canandaigua.”

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Extensive excavation and landscaping work was the first step in preparing Dan and Laurie’s site for their new home.

“Were there any special design considerations for the site, for the project?”

Pete grinned quickly before responding. “The short answer is the steep site,” he paused, flashing a grin again, “but you want to know more than that, right?” Another handful of crackers later he continued, “We wanted to create a nice way to get from the detached garage to the house, from guest parking to the house, from the house down to the water. Reducing the necessity of long, continuous stairs, descent and assent around the site was key. Extensive excavation and landscaping work was the first step in the solution. Ted Collins Landscaping has been a huge help there.”

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The home is set into the land, a part of the hillside. ICFs were used for the foundation and here are filled with concrete.

“I wanted to set the house into the site rather than rest it on top of the site. This minimizes some of the challenges of living on a hill and keeps the overall height within restrictions. Setting deeper into the land also helps the structure become more a part of the land, living with the land. Another benefit to sitting the house into the site was easier connections to the garage and parking. Plus, it brings everything closer to the lake.”

A pause for more crackers. At this point I was thinking about taking them away before the entire box was demolished and I was left with nothing for future interviewees. “There were a bunch of existing retainer walls,” he continued, “that were in disrepair. The plan we have replaces those with feature boulder walls against grading. They’re functionally stable, organic, and way prettier. There will be more natural paths of stepping stones, each with intentional pauses to break up the steps between structures.”

I wasn’t sure what he meant by ‘pauses’. “Like stair landings?”

“Yep. And some larger flats that will work as gathering areas along the way down to the lake.”

“Neat.” I smiled as ingratiatingly as possible. I had to move him out of my office before my crackers were entirely gone. “I’m going to ask you about this home several more times, but give me summary of the project and we’ll call it a wrap.”

img_20161031_090117275_hdr“This is a retreat home for Dan & Laurie and their family. It will be the central hub for all major gatherings and vacations. It is a single story with spaces throughout capturing views of the lake. We crafted a Douglas fir frame with a custom finish and inside it will have an in-law suite and a master suite on the main level. The walk-out lower will have a bunk room, guess suite, and rec room. Landscaping will include native plants and pleasant paths.”

“Great!” I reached slowly for the box of crackers, pulling them from his grasp. “Thanks Pete.”

Looking somewhat forlorn, he replied, “Sure thing, Megan.”

I’ll share pictures and details of the raising in a later blog. Below is a picture of current progress. Roofing and enclosure are nearly complete. Our construction team has been thankful for a fairly easy winter (so far!) in the Northeast.

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Sweeping Views and Gusting Wind: Raising the Barn in Colorado

newemailblast_12-2-16-aJim & Rebecca came to us with a dream for a timber frame barn that would be a centerpiece to their hilltop property in Castle Rock, CO. What a spot to call home! Our timber frame team arrived from Oregon to spend three weeks on-site raising the frame and enclosing the barn – all while soaking in the scenery.

20161004_18001620161005_174805Over the next few weeks, the team learned that Jim had fallen in love with timber frames in Ohio and made it a goal to call one his own. That’s our kinda’ goal; our thanks to Jim & Rebecca for enlisting us to build this 80′ by 32′ rough sawn Douglas fir timber frame barn.

20161006_1814061The barn doesn’t use any true trusses, but has plenty of traditional mortise and tenon joinery crafted in our McMinnville, OR shop by Darren, Mike, Jimmy, Todd, and David. A clerestory brings light into the structure while a ‘tower’ adds dynamic space.

20161010_07221720161013_094800Dynamic = dramatic, right? With regular wind gusting upwards of 120 mph on the hilltop, the team tells us (with their usual aplomb) there were a few interesting days. We can only imagine that flying structural insulated panels (SIPs) to enclose the frame while the wind whipped was quite a challenge. Extra straps, extra patience, and extra vigilance were certainly required. The SIP walls are 6.5″ achieving an R value near R28 while the 10 1/4″ roof SIPs achieve R42. Overall the enclosure is rated to handle those +120 mph winds.

 

fb_img_1476499532850On a free weekend, Mike, Darren, Todd, and Jimmy visited past clients in Estes Park, CO.

20161009_170125We know it can be hard to turn these congenial guys away, and John & Cindy went beyond to welcome them. They were even treated to a tour of the home and the entertainment of local wildlife.

An unexpected drop-in was met with smiles and a tour of John and Cindy's timber frame home. (Gosh we have wonderful clients! Or 'lovely folks' as Mike described.)

An unexpected drop-in was met with smiles, snacks, and a tour of John and Cindy’s timber frame home. (Gosh we have wonderful clients! Or, as Mike described them, “lovely folks”.)

Back at Jim & Rebecca’s the team finished the enclosure, complete with gable walls that extend higher than the roof, and give the barn a distinct look. The barn will function as part garage, part housing, with a full in-law suite on the upper level.

20161015_155103We’re looking forward to visiting Jim & Rebecca in 2017 and we’ll be sure to grab some images of the completed barn. We’d also like to note that the design for the barn was done by Kathy Eichelberger Jones, AIA of ArchStyle, Inc.

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Mike models a Superman t-shirt, a fun gift from a vendor, while installing t&g on the barn roof.

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The crew arrives on site during a foggy morning.

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The pre-assembled bents sitting on the barn foundation give a sense of just how large the structure will be once raised.

Running Timbers on the Hundegger

Andy operates the Hundegger controls and computer as a timber is processed.

Andy operates the Hundegger controls and computer as a timber is processed.

What is that big yellow, blue, and red tool? It is our Hundegger, a large CNC capable of cutting timbers with joinery. We have always liked the combination of technology with traditional craftsmanship. The marriage of both allows us to produce more efficiently, work with larger outputs, and helps our co-workers have a long career practicing their craft.

 

 

 

Andy has been our co-worker for 10 years and main operator of the Hundegger on the East Coast for over 5.

Andy has been our co-worker for 9 years and main operator of the Hundegger on the East Coast for over 5 years.

The CNCs in each of our shops rough cut timbers and joinery before the pieces head to layout and hand fitting/finishing. Andy is our main Hundegger operator on the east coast. He’s been a part of our team for a decade, starting as a timber framer, learning the trade from our master timber framers in the shop and then traveling around the nation to raise the frames he helped craft. Andy told us he liked the travel (before he had kids). He was up for a new challenge and went for the opportunity to learn the Hundegger technology. Most days he can be found standing at the main control station for the Hundgger between bouts loading the platform with raw timbers.

Reclaimed Red Pine Timbers celebrate the original surfaces with few to no old mortise pockets or peg holes. Phot

Reclaimed Red Pine Timbers celebrate the original surfaces with few to no visible old mortise pockets or peg holes. Photo (C) Sylwia Janik

 

 

Andy’s a quiet guy with a composed nature that makes him a great team member, as does his attention to detail. Part of Andy’s role is to determine which side of each timber will face the exterior wall and which will be visible to the room. This becomes especially important when working with reclaimed timbers.

“One project might call for old mortise pockets to be everywhere, while another may only want the reclaimed surface without any exposed peg holes or pockets. Sorting that out, working with each timber for a project, fresh or reclaimed, is a good daily challenge,” explains Andy.

 

 

 

Hundegger with Timber Stacks Watching the Hundegger rotate and cut full size timbers is mesmerizing. The sound of a timber being worked is so familiar to Andy that even with ear protection he can hear if a bit is getting dull or a clamp is overworking. The process is fluid. Once checked (and double checked), after a few keystrokes his hands are on the controls and the timber moves down the chain into the tool. Depending on the complexity of the cutting, it will be fed out the other end in a matter of minutes then move down another chain to be planed and put into layout.

Andy references printed wide format (‘old-school’ as he says) plans alongside a computer program with K2 coding for each project as he works individual timbers. Plans are often splayed across the work surface next to the Hundegger controls and computer screen.

Pointing to a large bottom cord on a set of plans Andy says, “The maximum size timber the tool can cut is 21″ wide and 12″ tall by just about any length. It has five axis cutting capability so we can rough out simple and complicated joinery.”

We use our Hundegger CNC tools to rough cut timbers and joinery.

We use our Hundegger CNC tools to rough cut timbers and joinery.

At the end of the day, the Hundegger is shut down falling silent before being swept out. The off-cuts are cleared out (and head to our high efficiency boiler to heat the plant). Files are saved and plans are rolled up. Andy organizes timbers for the following morning before heading home to his family. There he stays busy with his wife Ashley, their daughter Bristol, and son Luke. He’s also applying his skills to remodeling their family home. “Someday it’ll be done,” he told us with a light chuckle and a final critical study of the Hundegger as he headed out the door.